Injury Prevention Wellness

Halloween costumes that won’t send you to the ER

With Halloween just two weeks away, it’s now officially costume-picking crunch time.

There are many things to keep in mind when choosing a costume: one that’s cool, comfortable, impressive, scary… the list goes on. But the number one priority everyone should have when choosing a costume is simple: safety.

Thankfully, being safe doesn’t mean you have to compromise your other costume priorities (who would’ve thought safe and scary could go hand-in-hand?!)

Below are seven costume ideas & tips that not only meet our safety standards, but are pretty awesome (if we do say so ourselves):

Cover the face with special effects makeup instead of masks, which can obstruct vision. Our costume pick: The painted skull face. The perfect combination of creepy and artsy!

Outline outfits with reflective tape or stickers to stay visible. Our costume pick: The hotdog. Not only can you outline your hotdog bun with reflective tape, but you can embellish your costume with reflective condiments!

Stay seen by choosing light and bright colours. Our costume pick: Chef. Not only is the costume light & bright, but it gives you an excuse to can carry around food to snack on throughout the night.

Tripping hazards can be minimized by avoiding long and flowy materials. Our costume pick: A flower. Choosing pants over flowing skirts and dresses will help you avoid falls  — and really, who needs an excuse to wear a onesie all night long?

Use lightsabers, electric lanterns, wands, swords and other accessories to illuminate. Our costume pick: Anything with a lightsaber.

Minimize the risk for reactions by avoiding cosmetic contact lenses and testing make up in advance. Pro tip: Instead of inserting cat-eye contacts, which could irritate the eye, create the cat-eye look with makeup around the eyes (that you’ve tested in advance and doesn’t cause a reaction).

Expect cooler temperatures that require warm layers underneath. Our costume pick: A pilot. The costume is the perfect mix of making you look cool and keeping you warm.


What’s in a costume?

C – cover the face with special effects makeup instead of masks, which can obstruct vision

O – outline outfits with reflective tape or stickers to stay visible

S – stay seen by choosing light and bright colours

T – tripping hazards can be minimized by avoiding long and flowy materials

U – use lightsabers, electric lanterns, wands, swords and other accessories to illuminate

M – minimize the risk for reactions by avoiding cosmetic contact lenses and testing make up in advance

E – expect cooler temperatures that require warm layers underneath


Safety tips from the RBC First Office for Injury Prevention, aiming to prevent traumatic injuries and injury-related mortality across all ages.


Co-authored by Monica Matys, Communications Advisor & Jessica Lepore, Jr. Digital Communications Specialist at Sunnybrook

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